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Report – BORN FREE AND EQUAL
កើតមកមានសេរីភាព និងសមភាព

As the preceding chapters show, protecting LGBT people from violence and discrimination does not require the creation of a new set of LGBT-specific rights, nor does it require the establishment of new international human rights standards. For all the heat and complexity of the political debate about LGBT Equality at the United Nations, from a legal perspective the issue is straightforward. The obligations that States have to protect LGBT persons from violations of their human rights are already well established and are binding on all United Nations Member States.

This booklet seeks to explain the source and scope of those legal obligations with reference to the substantial body of decisions, recommendations and guidance issued by United Nations human rights mechanisms. It breaks down State responsibilities into five core areas where national action is most urgently needed – from protection from violence, to prevention of torture, decriminalization of homosexuality, prohibition of discrimination, and respect for freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly. In recent years, many States have made a determined effort to strengthen human rights protection in each of these areas. An array of new laws has been adopted – including laws banning discrimination, penalizing homophobic hate crimes, granting recognition of same-sex relationships and making it easier for transgender individuals to obtain official documents that reflect their preferred gender. Training programmes have been developed for police, prison staff, teachers, social workers and other personnel, and anti-bullying initiatives have been implemented in many schools. Click here to download full report both Khmer and English

As the preceding chapters show, protecting LGBT people from violence and discrimination does not require the creation of a new set of LGBT-specific rights, nor does it require the establishment of new international human rights standards. For all the heat and complexity of the political debate about LGBT Equality at the United Nations, from a legal perspective the issue is straightforward. The obligations that States have to protect LGBT persons from violations of their human rights are already well established and are binding on all United Nations Member States.

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This booklet seeks to explain the source and scope of those legal obligations with reference to the substantial body of decisions, recommendations and guidance issued by United Nations human rights mechanisms. It breaks down State responsibilities into five core areas where national action is most urgently needed – from protection from violence, to prevention of torture, decriminalization of homosexuality, prohibition of discrimination, and respect for freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly. In recent years, many States have made a determined effort to strengthen human rights protection in each of these areas. An array of new laws has been adopted – including laws banning discrimination, penalizing homophobic hate crimes, granting recognition of same-sex relationships and making it easier for transgender individuals to obtain official documents that reflect their preferred gender. Training programmes have been developed for police, prison staff, teachers, social workers and other personnel, and anti-bullying initiatives have been implemented in many schools. Click here to download full report both Khmer and English

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